Showing posts with label grammar activity. Show all posts
Showing posts with label grammar activity. Show all posts

Monday, 15 October 2012

Determiners

Determiners

Information from Learn English and an Exercise from the British Council

Determiners are small words used in front of nouns in English. They indicate whether you are referring to something specific (definite) or something more general (and indefinite).

Determiners are explained further in the title link; they are subdivided into two types general and specific.  

  • We use a specific or definite determiner when we know exactly what we are referring to:
Examples of specific determiners are:
the definite article : the
demonstratives : this, that, these, those
possessives : my, your, his, her, its, our, their

  • We use general determiners to talk about nouns without saying exactly who or what they are:
Examples of general determiners are:
the indefinite articles : a, an
a few
a little
all
another
any
both
each
either
enough
every
few
fewer
less
little
many
more
most
much

neither
no
other
several
some


Click on the title link, read through the information.  Then sort a list of determiners into two groups.

Sunday, 14 October 2012

Noun Phrases

Noun Phrases


Noun phrases can be made up of nouns, quantifiers, determiners and adjectives. 

Find out more with this grammar resource provided by the British Council.

  • Firstly, check that you understand what each type of word is.  Match each type of word with some examples.


- noun                                some, all, both

- quantifier                        older, taller, younger

- determiner                     some, a lot of, many

- adjective                        dogs, house, people


  • Secondly, you need to understand that noun phrases are made up in different ways.  For example:

- you can have just a 'noun' in a noun phrase


- or you can have a 'determiner + noun'


- or a 'quantifier + noun'


- or a 'determiner + adjective + noun'


- or a 'quantifier + determiner + noun'


- or you can have all 4 types of word - 'quantifier + determiner + adjective + noun'


  • Finally, click on the title link.  The exercise in the task matches the noun phrase in brackets to the patterns.

Tuesday, 4 September 2012

phrasal verbs

phrasal verbs

The information in the article explain two part verbs.  They consist of a verb and a preposition or particle.  In the elementary podcast this week different prepositions were used with the verb 'look'.

For example:-
look at - keeps the meaning of look as the same
look for - changes the meaning of look to 'find' or 'search'
look after - changes the meaning to 'care'

There is an exercise to do to test your knowledge of the phrasal verbs once you have read through the information in the article.